Shamrock Clover A Free Crochet Pattern

St Patrick’s Day is just around the corner. These Shamrock and Clover embellishments would make a great addition to anything ranging from hats, to home décor or any cute kid’s crafts for this holiday.

Free Crochet Patterns
Clover

You may even make a pin for St. Patrick’s Day parade dress up by adding a small pin to the back of these shamrock clover appliques, or add it to cards. 

Those of you who know me, know my fascination with fairies and everything to do with fairies. While reading about fairies, I came to know about Four-leaf clovers.

It is believed that one can see fairies if they carried a Four-leaf clover with them. Since then, I have been searching for it.

Whenever I come across a field of Shamrocks, I always make sure to scan the Shamrock population to see if my eyes can rest on just 1 teeny tiny Clover among them. But Nada! So far, I have seen none.

What makes the Four-leaf clover so important? According to Wikipidea “The four-leaf clover is an uncommon variation of the common, three-leaved clover. According to tradition, such leaves bring good luck to their finders, especially if found accidentally. In addition, each leaf is believed to represent something: the first is for faith, the second is for hope, the third is for love, and the fourth is for luck.”

I have yet to find a Four-leaf clover. Me, being an optimist, alchemist and a crochet scientist, I came up with this idea to design my own 4 leaf clover. Why not, right? I like to experiment new crochet patterns. I am going to pin this crochet clover on my vision board. I know for sure that someday Mother Nature will be kind enough to present it to me. :) 

While I came up with the Four-leaf clover design, I thought that the same applique can be turned into a Shamrock Clover with just a tiny tweak. So I made this Clover pattern into a Shamrock Clover pattern too.

I have always been fascinated with the history of things. I found some interesting information while researching about Shamrocks. While all shamrocks are clover, not all clovers are shamrocks. A Shamrock is associated with St. Patrick’s Day. It is a custom to wear a Shamrock on hats or in some way or another during the St. Patrick’s Day celebrations. The three petals of a Shamrock Clover means the Holy Trinity as per Irish traditions. Since St. Patrick is Ireland’s patron saint, Shamrock has been a symbol of Ireland since the 18th century.

St Patrick’s Shamrock and Lucky Irish Four Leaf Clover

Shamrock Clover
Shamrock Clover

Skills Level: Easy

Materials:

Suggested Yarn:

You will need about 2 yards of any Aran 10 ply (8 wpi) yarn in leafy green color. Some of my testers used Red Heart Super Saver yarn in Paddy Green and it worked great for them.

I Used:

Caron Simply Soft (100% Acrylic; 200 yds[182m]/3.5 oz [100 g]; CYCA #4): #2607 Limelight, 1 skein.

Crochet Hook:

Size G/ 4 mm or size needed to obtain gauge.

Notions:

Sewing Needle

Abbreviations: ( in US terminology)

  • ch(s) : chain(s)
  • st(s) : stitch(es)
  • sc : single crochet
  • dc – double crochet
  • sp : space (s)
  • sl st(s) : slip stitch(es)
  • rem : remaining
  • beg : beginning
  • rep : repeat
  • yds : yard/ yards
  • m : meter/ meters
  • oz : ounce/ ounces
  • g : gram / grams
  • mm : millimeter / millimeters
  • cm : centimeter / centimeters

Gauge:

4 sts + 4 rows = 1″ (2.54 cm) on size G (4 mm) hook.

Finished size: (Approximate)

1.5 inches tall

1.5 inches wide

Pattern Notes:

Do not turn or join unless otherwise stated. 

Stalk
Stalk

 

Stalk:

Leaving 1” yarn end in the beg, ch 8, sl st in 2nd ch from hook and all rem chs till the end. This marks the end of the stalk. (7 sts)

 

 

 

Shamrock Chart
Shamrock Chart

Note:

The arrows show the beginning and ending of the Shamrock and Clover in the charts. They start and end in the same stitch.

Shamrock:

(ch 3, dc, sc, dc, ch-3, sl st) 3 times in last st of stalk, pull the 1″ yarn end in the beg of the stalk tautly, fasten off and weave in ends with a sewing needle.(6 ch-3, 6 dc, 3 sc, 9 sl sts)

 

 

 

 

Clover Chart
Clover Chart

 

Clover:

(ch 3, dc, sc, dc, ch-3, sl st) 4 times in last st of stalk, pull the yarn end in the beg of the stalk tautly, fasten off and weave in ends.(8 times ch-3, 8 dc, 4 sc, 9 sl sts)

 

 

 

 

Stitches in pattern
Stitches in pattern

 

*****End of pattern*****

Thank you to all my testers: Margaret, Hollie, Cherie, Tracie, Jocelyn, Diane, Elizabeth for testing these patterns within a day. Love you all!!! Thank you Diane for enlightening me with some of the St Patrick’s Day history. ♥ 

If you use this pattern, feel free to add it to your projects on Ravelry.

This is how some of my testers used this applique: 

The Irish shamrock on a baby bonnet
The Irish shamrock on a baby bonnet by Jocelyn
Lucky Shamrock on baby longies
Lucky Shamrock on baby longies by Hollie

 

Pinterest Party St. Patrick’s Day Blog Hop

This post is part of the Pinterest Party St. Patrick’s Day Blog Hop. The Pinterest Party is a group that helps people grow their Pinterest following. Find other posts in this blog hop below:

Feb 18 Paula Atwell  How to Catch a Leprechaun

Feb 19 Jennifer Dickison Shamrock Craft for Kids – Bleeding Art Tissue Paper

Feb 20 Corrinna Johnson Rainbow In A Jar | Free Rainbow Printables

Feb 21 Elyn MacInnis   Celtic Knot Cookies – perfect for a St. Patrick’s Day tea!

Feb 23 Mamta Motiyani  Shamrock Clover Free Crochet Patterns

Feb 24 Tracey Boyer St. Patrick’s Day Treat – Lemon Glazed Krispie Treats

Feb 26 Ann-Marie Rohe Quick & Easy Grasshopper Brownie Bites

Feb 28 Jessica Peace-Urgelles Old Irish Blessing Printable: St Patrick’s Day

Mar 2 Chrisy Gallagher Kostecke St. Patrick’s Day Decorations

Mar 3 Stefany Thode Chocolate Avocado Cupcakes with Avacado Buttercream Frosting

9 thoughts on “Shamrock Clover A Free Crochet Pattern

  1. sylvestermouse

    Thank you for this crochet pattern! It will be perfect for little lapel pins and that touch of green the students need at school.

    1. Mamta

      You are welcome. Feel free to share your finished pins with us. :)

  2. Christine Gallagher

    this is adorable, I am pinning thanks for sharing

    1. Mamta

      Thank you for sharing it Christine. I appreciate it!

  3. ann miller

    thanks for this free crochet pattern – would be great on so many things. shared

    1. Mamta

      Thank you Ann & you are most wlecome. You are right. These designs can be used for making so many things other than what is just mentioned. :)

  4. Tracie Wilson

    These are great and work up really fast! They’ll make wonderful little lapel and hat pins for St. Patty’s Day! Thanks for sharing!

    1. Mamta

      Thanks Tracie. Wonderful ideas!

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